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A History of the Later Roman Empire : From Arcadius to Irene (395 A. D. To 800 A. D. )

By Bury, J. B.

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Book Id: WPLBN0000673291
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 19.67 MB.
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: A History of the Later Roman Empire : From Arcadius to Irene (395 A. D. To 800 A. D. )  
Author: Bury, J. B.
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Political science., Economics and literature, Economic & political studies series
Collections: Economics Publications Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Archive for the History of Economic Thought

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Bury, J. (n.d.). A History of the Later Roman Empire : From Arcadius to Irene (395 A. D. To 800 A. D. ). Retrieved from http://community.worldlibrary.net/


Description
Economic Theory Literature

Excerpt
Preface: LONDON 1889, THERE is no period of history which has been so much obscured by incorrect and misleading titles as the period of the later Roman Empire. It is, I believe, more due to improper names than one might at first be disposed to admit, that the import of that period is so constantly misunderstood and its character so often misrepresented. For the first step towards grasping the history of those centuries through which the ancient evolved into the modern world is the comprehension of the fact that the old Roman Empire did not cease to exist until the year 1453. The line of Roman Emperors continued in unbroken succession from Octavius Augustus to Constantine Palaeologus. Now this essential fact is obscured as far as language is able to obscure it by applying the name Byzantine or the name Greek to the Empire in its later stages. Historians who use the phrase Byzantine Empire are not very consistent or very precise as to the date at which the Roman Empire ends and the Byzantine Empire begins. Sometimes the line is drawn at the foundation of Constantinople by Constantine the Great, sometimes at the death of Theodosius the Great, sometimes at the reign of Justinian, sometimes (as by Finlay) at the accession of Leo the Isaurian; and the historian who adopts one line of division cannot assert that the historian who adopts a different line is wrong. For all such lines are purely arbitrary. No Byzantine Empire ever began to exist; the Roman Empire did not come to an end until 1453. But, it may be objected, is it not true that the Roman.

 

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