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Monetary Theory before Adam Smith

By Monroe, Arthur Eli

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Book Id: WPLBN0000698922
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 715.97 KB.
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Monetary Theory before Adam Smith  
Author: Monroe, Arthur Eli
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Political science., Economics and literature, Economic & political studies series
Collections: Economics Publications Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: Archive for the History of Economic Thought

Citation

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Monroe, A. E. (n.d.). Monetary Theory before Adam Smith. Retrieved from http://community.worldlibrary.net/


Description
Economic Theory Literature

Excerpt
Preface: Few aspects of modern economic discussion have their roots so deeply in the past as the theory of money. Not only were most phases of it discussed before the time of Adam Smith, but some of our ideas concerning it may almost be called commonplaces since the beginning of the Modern Age. A knowledge of this material is, therefore, indispensable for a proper appreciation of the work of later writers. No survey of early monetary theory has been available in English, however, and no adequate one in other languages. This was brought home to me some years ago, when I was trying to evaluate the work of certain early American pamphleteers, and as a result I abandoned my original project and undertook the present study. As will be clear from the table of contents, this is a history of theories rather than of theorists or of their times. The ideas of each writer, instead of being presented as a whole, have been considered in connection with various convenient and significant subdivisions of the subject. This heightens the impression of continuity, facilitates the comparison of ideas, and brings out relations which might otherwise escape notice. Brief general estimates of the work of particular writers are given in the several introductory chapters. To spare the reader the tedium of repetition and diffuseness considerable rearranging of scattered ideas has been necessary, but care has been taken not to read anything into a writer that is not consistent with his work as a whole. References to general and monetary history have been kept at a minimum; for, although such information often helps to explain the interests, policies, and even the errors of the writers of different times and places, it does not affect the validity of their reasoning, and its elaboration serves only to distract attention.

Table of Contents
Table of Contents. Preface. ................................................................................................................... 5 Part I: The Ancient World. ..................................................................................... 6 Chapter I: Introductory. .............................................................................. 6 Chapter II: Greece ...................................................................................... 6 Chapter III: Rome .................................................................................... 10 Chapter IV: Summary. ............................................................................. 11 Part II: The Middle Ages. ..................................................................................... 13 Chapter V: Introductory. .......................................................................... 13 Chapter VI: Building on Tradition. .......................................................... 15 Chapter VIII: Other New Problems ........................................................ 22 Chapter IX: Summary. ............................................................................. 28 Part III: The Beginnings of the Modern Age. ...................................................... 30 Chapter X: Introductory. .......................................................................... 30 Chapter XI: Traditional Doctrines. .......................................................... 32 Chapter XII: The Value of Money. .......................................................... 35 Chapter XIII: New Light on Old Problems. ............................................. 40 Chapter XIV: Summary. .......................................................................... 48 Part IV: From Davanzati to Locke. ...................................................................... 50 Chapter XV: Introductory. ....................................................................... 50 Chapter XVI: The Origin and Functions of Money. ................................ 53 Chapter XVII: Some Questions of Policy. ............................................... 55 Chapter XVIII: The Coinage System. ...................................................... 60 Chapter XIX: The Value of Money. ......................................................... 65 Chapter XX: The Theory of Price Changes. ............................................ 76 Chapter XXI: The Principles of Circulation. ........................................... 81 Chapter XXII: The Velocity of Circulation. ............................................ 88 Chapter XXIII: The Problem of Reform. ................................................. 90 Chapter XXIV: Summary. ....................................................................... 93 Part V: The Eighteenth Century. .......................................................................... 96 Chapter XXV: Introductory. .................................................................... 96 Chapter XXVI: The Origin and Functions of Money. ........................... 100 Chapter XXVII: Some Questions of Policy. .......................................... 108 Chapter XXVIII: The Coinage System. ................................................. 115


 

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